DIY Video:How to build a Simple Battery Backup Power Station for Emergency Power

    This project goes over the setup of a simple battery bank for your offgrid applications.

    We use three AGM batteries, and they’re about 245 amp hours each.Marine or deep cycle batteries also work. Dont get a car battery.Make sure that the batteries are about same age or they start bringing each other down.

    The wires are connected through the positive ports and negative ports of each batteries.

    The positive from the inverter is connected to the positive of the first battery .Negative from the inverter is connected to the negative of the 3rd battery.

    The battery chargers are from Pros Series DSR.It ramps up the optimum charging voltage.



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