Cool DIY Video : How to run a Gasoline Engine on Waste Vegetable oil / Used Motor oil .

This video shows a vegetable oil heavy fuel gasifier that I built in an attempt to fuel a gasoline engine with waste oil. Here i test this with an old lawnmower engine. In this video I use vegetable oil as fuel, but used motor oil should work as well.The other videos shows the build of a similar used motor oil gasifier that I built from an old fire extinguisher and some pipe. It works by pyrolysis.This one has an improved burner and sideways canister orientation.

Watch the Waste Motor oil/Used Vegetable oil Vapor Generator Build Videos



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