How to build a Homemade DIY Waste Oil Tree Stump Burner . Easy and cheapest way to remove Tree Stumps




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    This video series shows the build of a Homemade Bandsaw Mill from Start to finish.The design for the saw is a good one, in that it was rock solid as it was making the cuts. Making the saw itself move as opposed to moving the wood through it would really make the build a lot more complex. Beefing up the frame to resist movement (chatter) while cutting through 16" of hard maple would be difficult, especially if the height was also adjustable.Using a stick to lever the wood through the saw was a very good way to regulate a steady feed rate and took little effort. For serious cutting in green, thick hardwood, a 2hp motor doesn't really "cut" it. To make the cutting more efficient (read faster), the blade speed should be very high - as high as 6000 fpm - and a motor that size doesn't have the power. A 6-8 hp gas engine would be much better

    Watch the DIY Homemade Wooden Bandsaw Mill Video series

  • How to build your own 24 X 24 Garage and save money. Step by Step Build Instructions
    This video shows Step by step pictures of me building a 24X24 garage.The first video shows steps involving how to pour footings, walls, floors and framing,Installing trusses, etc and the second video go over construction ideas, tips, as well as the entire area of buying materials, building permits, and the paperwork required for building a 24'x24' garage.Adding a garage to your property can give you a lot of additional storage, it will give you covered parking spaces to store your car, and it can add to your property value.

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  • How to Heat your Home for Free by building Solar Air Heating Collectors that uses no electricity or batteries
    This video series shows step by step the build and installation of a Simple Solar Air Heating Collectors that uses no electricity or batteries made from salvaged materials.The air enters at the center bottom of the collector, where an aluminum baffle spreads the flow across the width of the collector on the glazing side of the screen absorber. The air rises up between the glazing and the absorber, and eventually finds its way through the three layers of screen absorber and flows to the back side of the collector. The air then flows up the back side of the collector to the exit vent located at the top of the collector.

    Watch the DIY Homemade Solar Air Heating Collectors Build Series