DIY Video: How to build a Band Sawmill from scratch in your backyard and save a lot of money. Step by step build instructions.



    This video series shows the step by step build of a homemade Band Sawmill from scratch in your backyard.Harvesting and processing the wood that grows on your property is the dream of many homesteaders. The dream can be expensive (around $5k) because you need a sawmill in order to rip the wood and remove the bark.Instead of spending years saving up, you can spend less by building your own saw mill.it’s a tool you’ll use for years to come, and will more than pay for itself the first time you use it. Lumber isn’t cheap, and if you’ve got the natural resources and access to those resources, it makes the most sense to save money, time, and effort by using what you have available.

    Watch the DIY step by step build of the Band Sawmill series



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