DIY Video : How to build a Homemade Atmospheric Water Generator . Produces/Extracts Distilled Water from the air

    This project goes over the build of an DIY Atmospheric Water Generator that distills water from air. This unit is made of aluminum and copper components so it is water safe and is drinkable. The water essentially is just pure distilled water just as clean as if it is distilled from a stovetop distiller. This setup works well in hot humid weather. Also acts a dehumidifier.

    The materials you need to build this project are quarter inch copper tubing, soup can, half inch PVC pipe, 12V DC aquarium pump, aluminum foil, clear vinyl tubing, aluminum tray for collecting the distilled water ,small styrofoam cooler box. Cold Water is pumped through two sets of coiled copper tubes. The coil becomes freezing cold and starts to condensate . Dew gets collected on the coil and is captured by a drip pan which is placed under the coil.

    The copper tubes are wrapped around a soup can to get the coiled shape. The clear PVC hose tube is clamped onto the coil and then connected to a small 12V DC aquarium water pump which is powered by a battery or solar panel.

    We take two half inch PVC pipes , connect them together with two elbows . Wrap the PVC pipes with some aluminum foil and place the pipes above an aluminum or glass tray.

    The water pump is then submerged in a chest box or bucket containing ice cold water. The pump is started and water coming out of the box cooler is sent through the copper coil where it will start the condensation process. Here the water is chilled to below its dew point. If the water is warm, it wont cool the copper coil enough for the condensation to occur.

    The colder the water and the more humid it is out , the faster the process of collecting distilled water. To improve the efficiency , you could squeeze the copper coils together . The more the coils, the more the water you can extract from air .



    RECENT POSTS YOU MIGHT LIKE
    • How to Dig a Shallow Well from Start to Finish for offgrid homesteading
      This project goes over how you can dig your own shallow well using simple tools that you can get from your local garden store. The materials you need to dig and install a well are as follows. A customized Seymour AUA2 Post Auger to dig the hole. A Shovel is used to move the pea gravel and dirt out of the way. A Four inch casing PVC pipe that is going into the hole that is dug and this is going to hold the water until you need it. One and one fourth inch threaded adapter. This connects the bottom of the casing pipe to the foot valve. The foot valve is one and one quarter inch. This valve allows the water to come in and not go out. This helps to keep the pump primed. A water well pump pipe which is basically a one and one quarter inch PVC pipe. This will pull the water from the bottom of the well bringing it to your pump. The length of this pipe is going to be determined by how deep your well is. It should be at least a foot shorter than the depth of your well. You don't want this pipe sitting on the bottom because it would just be sitting in sediment and it will be clogging things up. A pitcher pump that has a one and one quarter inch threaded water inlet at the bottom. A closet flange. It makes mounting the pump to the top of your well four inch casing pipe very easy and it also helps keep things clean. Basically you would just set this inside you your four inch pipe, drill a hole out of the middle of a board, screw that to the top of this flange then mount your pump to the board that you have fastened to this. A one and one quarter inch threaded adapter. This will screw into the bottom of your pitcher pump and in turn, it will connect to the pipe bringing water to your pump from the bottom of the well. Teflon tape, PVC glue. Pea gravel - This will go down around the casing pipe of the well. The amount of pea gravel you need is determined by the depth of the well and water height. Quikcrete or aerated concrete to cap the top of the well. This prevents groundwater contamination and keeps stuff from finding a way to easily get into your well. To find the spot for the well, we use couple of coat hangers as dowsing roads. We take a drinking straw ,cut it in half and slide it over the coat hangers. This helps us in not using our hands or fingers influence while dowsing. Also it is easy to rotate the rods within the straws. The rods are kept parallel to the ground . If the rods cross each other , then mark the spot on the ground directly down the cross . This is the ideal spot for the well. The auger used for digging the hole for the well is modified from the default Seymour Post hole auger. We use a custom 5 foot 11 gauge one and half inch square tubing as the extension for the auger . The handle of the auger is a three foot three quarter inch pipe welded to a four inch 11 gauge square tubing. We start digging into the the spot that we have found earlier using the dowsing rods. Pay attention to the changes in the color of sand , because that can give you clues as whether you are getting closer to water. We extend the auger using the square bar tube once the auger handle is near the ground. Once you have hit wet clay, there is going to be suction around. We twist and pull at the same time to get the auger out of the hole in this situation. Next, we put the 20 foot PVC casing pipe into the hole . We cut slots using a reciprocating saw on the pipe one foot from the bottom of the well to the top of the water level to allow the water to flow into the well. Pea gravel is poured around the sides of the pipe all the way up to the slots . The remaining hole area around the pipe is packed with sand and clay. We seal the well by packing it around the sides with quickrete cement. This helps the water not to be able to run down into your well but around it. We lower the one and one quarter inch well pump pipe with the foot valve at the end into the PVC casing pipe. A four inch drain flange is secured on top of the casing pipe . A pitcher pump is then attached to top of the pipe. To prevent the pump from moving, it is bolted to the board where the flange is installed. To prime the well, we pour some water down through the pitcher pump. Pump out the dirty water until it is clean. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5rYPRMm8Arw
    • How to build an Emergency Waste Oil or Used Vegetable Oil Candle from Old Nail Polish Bottle
      This project goes into the build of a simple and inexpensive waste oil/ used vegetable oil candle from an old nail polish bottle. You can burn motor oil ,vegetable oil, olive oil or you can also use lamp oil in these types of candles. The first thing your need for this oil candle is a reservoir to hold the oil in. Here we use a finger nail polish bottle. Next , a length of 100% cotton yarn is needed that is slightly longer than the length of the bottle. Another requirement is a one inch square piece of aluminum foil. The first thing you need to do to start this process is to take the bottle , clean it completely and fill it with your source of fuel like veg oil, waste motor oil, corn oil, olive oil . When you are pouring the oil, you don't want to go all the way up to the top of the bottle. Leave small amount of space at the top of the bottle. Take the aluminum foil and fold it length wise in half .Puncture a small hole in the middle of the foil . Through this hole, the cotton wick is pushed through. Lower the wick into the bottle and fold the aluminum foil around the neck of the bottle. This acts as a lid . Make sure that everything is folded down nice and tight around the bottle. Check the candle and see if this wick is wet. And if it is not , turn it upside down for a minute . The oil will then come into this wick and saturate it. Be careful that your aluminum foil doesn't fall off. If your cotton wick is a little bit longer, pull it up a little bit . This exposes the wet part of the wick. Take your scissors and cut the wick down just a little. Light the candle . When you first go to light them it takes a minute because you have to get everything warmed up. Let it burn a little bit. Make sure to not use a thick layer of aluminum foil for the lid. The aluminum foil will heat up and cause problems. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LbHFrvL99eA
    • DIY Video:How to build a Simple Homemade Pocket Straw Style Water Filter. Small, lightweight and powerful.
      This project goes over the build of an emergency Straw Style Survival Water Filter. This water filter is small, lightweight and ideal for an SHTF scenario or hiking/camping. Very effective for purifying rain or tap water or removing disease causing water contaminants. With regular maintenance the filter should last for years. The materials needed to make this water filter are turkey baster , cotton balls, coffee filters,activated carbon. All these materials can be purchased from your local store or aquarium supply stores. The activated carbon is rated to last for five months if used regularly. Start by taking a cotton ball and push it down the turkey baster. Rinse the activated carbon by running it through tap water before putting them over the cotton balls. Pour the rinsed activated carbon all the way to the top of the pipe and put two more cotton balls at the top . Now take some coffee filter paper and slide it over the top of the cotton balls and tie it down using a twist tie or rubber band so that the whole thing wont slip out when you are using it. If you don't have the cotton balls available, you can always just ball up some pieces of coffee filter paper and put them on either end of the activated carbon in between. An alternative way of using this is to cut the top of the poultry baster and and put it on the top of the straw . Take the dirty water and manually filter it through the straw. Once the material inside the filter gets saturated water moves pretty thoroughly through the straw. The cotton balls in the paper will get dirty pretty quick up here capturing most of the dirt but you can just pull those out periodically and add new ones. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zXJypLXwsiw