DIY Video: How to build a Homemade Hot Water Off grid Air Heater using Heat Exchanger and a Car Radiator Fan


    This video shows the build of a Homemade Hot Water Air Heater using an old heat exchanger and a car radiator fan.This unit provides near-instant warm air.The Air-Flow: it’s adjustable from 10 CFM to 1500 CFM. max breeze 20 Mph! The Temps: With input water temps between 120F to 150F the output air temp ranged from 85F to 110F. *or from heat pump temps up to near furnace temps! easily warms a room or two, maybe more.The heart of the unit is an 8×8 Copper/Aluminum Heat Exchanger., This unit can easily be run straight from a 12v solar panel or battery so it’s “off-grid” ready. Simply mounted the fan in front of it,then connected the pipes. then you just connect a small water pump (200-350 gph) to one of the pipes and drop both pipes into a water-filled sink,almost immediately it creates very warm air (in under a minute).

    Watch the DIY Homemade Homemade Hot Water Off grid Air Heater Build Video



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