DIY Video :How to build a Simple and Efficient Copper Coil Burner Stove from start to finish.Great in a emergency/disaster or while out camping



    This video shows the build of a Simple Homemade Copper Coil Burner Stove. Works great and would be perfect for cooking or boiling water, either in an emergency/disaster or while out camping.This is made out of a canning jar which was picked up from Walmart.The other materials required are some copper tubing,strong glue like jb kwik weld,couple of drill bits,wick material.This is really easy to make and works really efficiently.

    Watch the Homemade  Simple Copper Coil Burner Stove Build



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