DIY Video: How to build an efficient rocket mass heater from scraps for your garage


    This Video series shows the build of an efficient rocket mass heater from scraps for your garage.This  rocket mass heater is the ultra high efficiency, mass based, thermal storage, chambered combustion, for internal energy dissipation, causing time released electromagnetic radiation, and conduction of energy, heating system.Not only do they provide your home with wonderful warmth but they can also heat your home at a fraction of the cost and without leaving that harmful carbon footprint. Best of all, you can build one yourself, and this is an amazing way of helping keep your home off the grid and self-sufficient.

    Watch the DIY efficient rocket mass heater build series



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