DIY Video : How to build an Off Grid DIY 12 Volt Washing Machine from junk parts and pieces laying around

    This video shows the build of a homemade 12V washing machine made from junk parts and pieces laying around.Most of the materials you’ll need can be found around your house and most certainly at your local hardware store.Great for going off grid for a while preparing to be survive in case of SHTF or are you just a regular old camper that needs clean clothes at camp.Laundry has come up a number of times as a self-sufficiency topic. It makes sense for a couple reasons. First of all, because many people in our crowd are wanting to be self-sufficient of the electrical and water grids, and need find another way of washing clothes. Secondly, because we are also usually looking for ways to save money.

    Watch the DIY Off Grid DIY 12V Washing Machine build video



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