How to build a Homemade Copper Pipe Solar Water Heater and get super hot water fast and free

    This project goes over the build of a Homemade Copper Pipe Solar Thermal Water heater which can produce super hot water fast .This reaches temperature at or above 150F with air temperature from high 40’s to low 50’s.

    Here are the materials needed for this project are :
    Two 10 foot half inch copper pipes – Type L
    16 half inch 90 degree elbows
    18 tube straps
    23 X 35 half inch plywood for the back
    18 X 20 half inch plywood for the pipe support
    2 X 2 lumber at 20 and 35″ for the sides
    4 and 3/8 inch square dowel rods for the glass support
    1/2 inch threaded pipe adapter
    3/4″ to 1/2″ garden hose PVC adapter
    1/2 inch coupler.

    The first step is to cut down a bunch of two foot sections out of the 10 foot sections using a copper cutter. We cut 7 of them and 2 more for the top and bottom which are 30 inches each.

    Next we cut 8 sections of 1 1/8″ for the connecter pieces between elbow joints. This allows the pipe to be spaced exactly two inches apart on the board evenly all the way up and down

    Connect the pipes using couple of elbows and a 2 inch connecter piece and solder them .Do it for the rest of the pipes.

    Slide the pipes into the plywood frame collector and fasten them onto it using 3/8 inch screws to be more secure. A small internal board is placed onto this frame which helps the pipe to lay flat inside .Also it holds the pipe at right height so that it exits through the right holes. It allows for the pipe to be easily removed from the collector frame.

    Cut the wooden dowel rods and put inside the collector to support the glass. Sand them a little bit so that the copper pipe will fit back through.

    A straight coupler is welded on to the end of outlet then you can add any pipe or connecter or wherever you want the water to go.

    The inner board is secured to the back board using some three quarter inch screws. The 4 corners of the 2 X 2 wood frame is secured using 2 and half inch wood screws and the corners of the back board is secured by one and one half inch screws.

    A 20 X 32 inch glass is placed on the frame with the help of some silicone caulk around the edge. The highest piece of copper in there is eighth of an inch away from the glass and its painted black.



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