How to build an DIY 12 V Portable Water Pump Box with filtration system for Outdoor Survival / RV

    This project goes into the build of an offgrid portable water pump and filtration system that can turn any water from your creek,lake,river into safe and clean drinking water . This 12V portable system can be powered by solar or from your car directly and is ideal for camping , RV or outdoor survival enthusiasts. This system enables them to pump water from a fresh water source, filter and then store or use in case of emergency survival situation.

    The materials you need to build this portable filtration system are as follows. A tactix storage box to lodge the water pump,inlet and outlet hoses, an inline water filter or twin carbon 0.5micron filter, pex pipe, garden hose pipes, 12mill barb strainer,rocker switch ,12V Shurflo water pump with the flow rate of 11 litres per minute, 50 amp Anderson plug and 10m heavy duty wire ,basic tools such as wire cutters, long nose pliers, solder.

    The first step is completing the wiring for the water pump inside the tactix tool box. The rocker switch , the Anderson plug and a 7.5 Amp inline fuse are wired. The 12V rocker toggle switch is mounted at the center of the box lid.

    The power input plug or the Anderson plug is mounted to the left of the switch. This input plug connects to the car battery or a solar battery. The positive red wires from the switch is connected to the Anderson plug through an inline fuse .The negative black wire from the plug goes straight to the switch. The remaining wires from the switch is then connected to the water pump which will be installed later. The wires are covered with corrugated split tubing to ensure that it is protected and safe.

    The filter strainer is installed on the inlet side of the pump using an elbow, thread tapes. The strainer will filter out any unwanted debris before it goes to the pump.

    Couple of holes are drilled into to the side of the box where the inlet and the outlet hoses will connect the water pump. The male fitting are attached to the holes before the pump is installed.

    The pump is placed inside the box and mounted securely in such a way that the elbows are facing towards the two holes for the exterior hoses that was just made at the side of the box. Once the pump is mounted ,we connect the red and black wires coming from the switch to the positive and negative connections of the pump. The wires are once again covered with corrugated split tubing for safety.

    To connect the pump with the hose outlets , we measure the distance between the outlets and the pump and connect two pex pipes . Heat was applied to the pipe for bending and moulding them to connect the outlets.

    The 10 metre 50 Amp Anderson plug extension heavy duty cable wire is connected to the power source .Here the power draw is from a car battery. The other end is connected the input anderson plug on the top side of the box.

    The inlet hose with the strainer attached is placed sitting midway
    into the water source .The other end of the hose is connected to the intake pipe coming from the pump inside the box. The

    The other hose is connected to the outlet pipe coming from the water pump inside the box. At the end of the hose , we connect an inline water filter or a twin carbon filter . The carbon filter ensures that there is no sediments or debris inside the water and also helps to eliminate bacteria and other contaminants.



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