Privacy Policy

Privacy Policy
My Blog takes your privacy seriously. This privacy policy describes what personal information we collect and how we use it. See this privacy policy primer to learn more about privacy policies in general.

Routine Information Collection
All web servers track basic information about their visitors. This information includes, but is not limited to, IP addresses, browser details, timestamps and referring pages. None of this information can personally identify specific visitors to this site. The information is tracked for routine administration and maintenance purposes.

Cookies and Web Beacons
Where necessary, My Blog uses cookies to store information about a visitor’s preferences and history in order to better serve the visitor and/or present the visitor with customized content.

Advertising partners and other third parties may also use cookies, scripts and/or web beacons to track visitors to our site in order to display advertisements and other useful information. Such tracking is done directly by the third parties through their own servers and is subject to their own privacy policies.

Controlling Your Privacy
Note that you can change your browser settings to disable cookies if you have privacy concerns. Disabling cookies for all sites is not recommended as it may interfere with your use of some sites. The best option is to disable or enable cookies on a per-site basis. Consult your browser documentation for instructions on how to block cookies and other tracking mechanisms. This list of web browser privacy management links may also be useful.

Special Note About Google Advertising
Any advertisements served by Google, Inc., and affiliated companies may be controlled using cookies. These cookies allow Google to display ads based on your visits to this site and other sites that use Google advertising services. Learn how to opt out of Google’s cookie usage. As mentioned above, any tracking done by Google through cookies and other mechanisms is subject to Google’s own privacy policies.

Contact Information
Concerns or questions about this privacy policy can be directed to admin@practicalsurvivalist.com for further clarification.

This privacy policy was generated by the Privacy Policy for WordPress plugin.



RECENT POSTS YOU MIGHT LIKE
  • How to build a Super Efficient Portable Rocket Mass Heater from reclaimed and repurposed items and save up to 80% on your heating bills
    This project goes over the build of a homemade efficient rocket mass heater which is portable ,uses less fuel and burns clean. This heater is made out of reclaimed and repurposed materials. The cool thing about a rocket mass heater is that it stays warm long long after the fire is out. The whole thing is powered by a rocket stove, which is a j shaped burn chamber. Fuel goes in the short side of the J, the fire burned sideways and the bottom of it. And then the draw is created by a tall vertical heat riser. The gases then come out of that chimney go all around the inside of the barrel, a lot of the heat is given off into the room right off of the barrel. That's your radiant heat source for the room. The barrel acts as that radiant heat source. The gases then go through a valve in the barrel down below and through a series of tubes that are encased in mass such as aircrete or cob .The gases are able to shed the heat into the cob. And the cob stores it as a thermal battery. The gases make its rounds through the tubes and goes out through the exhaust pipe. The rocket mass heater shown here is made of a burn chamber, heat riser, bench for containing the tubes , the exhaust pipe and an insulation refractory material like aircrete which is a high temperature cement mix. The burn chamber is made from an old sheet metal pressure tank and a stainless steel water heater tank. The pressure tank insulated with aerated concrete sits inside the water heater tank. The combustion or gasification chamber is connected to the heat riser chimney through a three inch pipe insulated inside a six inch pipe. This pipe is also insulated with a refractory mix. The vortex chamber is connected to this pipe. The vortex chamber is made from a saw blade and a left over piece of pressure tank material . It is insulated with the refractory material . Six glue stick 3/8th inch air holes are drilled at right angles around this refractory material that creates a vortex extra air suction effect .So as that heat comes up and creates a negative pressure up the riser, it swirls around the vortex chamber and enhances the burn. The initial combustion creates enough heat to release way more gases than it has oxygen to burn. By introducing a vortex air intake system, the burn output is amplified. For making the insulated heat riser, we are going to use an aerated concrete refractory material called aircrete . We make the mould for the four inch heater riser using a metal mesh fabric, sarnafil roofing material and a thin gauge wire. Then it is filled it clay sand up to to the top . We take this mould and put it inside the six inch stove pipe and pour aircete through the sides all the way up to the top and let them sit to cure. We pull the sand out of the center of the heat riser. And then eject the liner that went against the inner fabric webbing that acted as a mold for the aircrete. The Aircrete heat riser is installed on top of the vortex chamber .The heat riser is double insulated with a old water tank and an old 55 gal oil barrel. Also the water tank is insulated from the 55 gal barrel using some pea gravel .The insulated water tank has an outlet pipe at the bottom for extension into the mass bench . The exhaust pipe coming out the insulated heat riser has a two foot drop to a directional valve connecting two pipes ,one pipe acts as a flue chimney that goes out into the outdoors through the window, the other goes into the mass bench. The valve allows us to redirect the air to pass to the bench once the heat riser is all warm. The eight foot long wooden mass bench houses the six inch stove pipes coming out the exhaust of the heat riser. It has a mylar reflective insulation sheet on the floor. This helps prevent the heat escape through the floor .The mass bench is then insulated with pea gravel which absorbs the heat and holds it and slowly radiate out over a period of time. The pipe coming out of the bench goes out of the window through the valve. The flue chimney pipe that goes out through the window to the outdoors is made of double walled stove pipe. A five inch pipe is inserted inside a seven inch pipe. The space between them is insulated with a aerated concrete refractory material .All this insulated exhaust pipe is doing is taking and adding an element of acceleration up the chimney to negate the net negative you get from dropping two feet down into the bench from the heat riser. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1ZKm7QZ-dY
  • How to recycle scrap metal in the backyard by building a simple Mini Metal Foundry from start to finish
    In this project, we're using equal parts of sand and plaster to make a simple backyard foundry that's powerful enough to melt scrap metal in seconds. With this homemade furnace, we have the power to liquefy aluminum in the backyard and cast just about any object we can think of. You will need some big bag of play sand and some plaster of paris both of which you can find at your local hardware store for under $20. We are also going to need a 10 quart steel bucket and a tablecloth to cover anything. For this makeshift refractory lining we need One and 1/3 buckets full of plaster Paris or 21 cups, One and 3/4 buckets full of sand or 21 cups and 1 and 1/4 buckets filled with water or 15 cups. Mix everything together. It's really important to get all the dry powder wet and work out any lumps as quickly as possible. And after mixing for a couple of minutes, it should be fairly runny and roughly all the same color. Transfer the mix to the steel bucket upto 3 inches from top. We use the plastic measuring bucket to form the center of the foundry. Let the mixture dry for 3 minutes. Next step ,we turn an old steel fire extinguisher into a custom crucible. Depressurize the tank and unscrewed the valve from the top to make it safe and easy to cut in half with a hacksaw. At this point the plaster should be pretty well set. So let's dump the water from the bucket then use a pair of channel locks to pull the bucket out. Next step is make an air supply port .Using 3/8 inch hole saw and a metal cutting blade, we cut a hole to accommodate the one inch steel blower tube. The blower tube is made of one inch steep pipe ,one inch PVC coupling and one inch PVC pipe.Threads on one half of the coupling screw onto the steel pipe and the slip adapter on the other end simply pushes onto the PVC side easily. Next step is to build a lid to retain the heat.You need a couple of 4 inch U bolts.Make them stand upright into a 5 quart bucket filled with the insulating mix. To relieve pressure buildup, make a vent hole using a 3 inch hole cutting saw. This design works great for venting pressure and gives us the option to melt metal as well without even having to take the lid off the furnace. By the way, if you run out of soda cans to melt, you could try using it as a blacksmithing forge or even a barbecue for summertime grilling. We evenly place 5 charcoal briquettes at the bottom of the crucible made out of steel fire extinguisher, helps smelt the can faster once we fire it up. A hair dryer is taped to a PVC pipe and inserted a couple of one inch couplings to connect the steel tub eat one end and give the blower to a quick release feature. This way it's super easy to take apart and fits into a five gallon bucket for easy storage. The charcoal is filled it to the top and we breathe life into the steel furnace with a propane torch.The hairdryer is set to the low setting and blow a steady stream of oxygen on the charcoal to really heat things up. The lid we made keeps the heat inside so it conserves energy while it's bringing up the temperature. The coolest part is that the crucible lines up perfectly with the hole in the center. The container is three inches wide, which is the perfect size for melting standard size soda cans like these and at temperatures over 1000 degrees Fahrenheit . In order to isolate aluminium, first we remove the crucible making sure we have got a very secure grip with our tongs and slowly pour the liquid into a steel mold. The Soda cans are molded in the form of ingots.The purpose of an ingot is to keep some pure metal handy for when you want to make something cool. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hHD10DjxM1g https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lSoWxG30rb0
  • How to build a Simple Homemade Wood Burning Stove heater with Heat Exchanger for your Garage .No Electricity required and Inexpensive‚Ķ..
    This project goes into the build of a homemade wood burning heater with a heat exchanger for your garage . This heater is build from a recycled old propane tank . The other materials you need to build this heater are 55 gallon drum, fan blower, quarter inch steel plates , eighteen 2 inch steel pipes for the heat exchanger, welding unit, plasma cutter. Before cutting into the propane tank , make sure to clean the tank so that there is no residual gas left in it . Cut both ends of the tank using the plasma cutter. Now we cut a 30 inch length piece from the tank .This acts as a main body where the heat exchanger pipes are installed. The heat exchanger consists of 18 two inch pipes that run the length of the heater from front to back. Two quarter inch steel plates are welded at the ends of the propane tank . Before doing that we make 18 holes at both the ends of the steel plate. This is done to install the heat exchanger pipes across the length of the tank. With the help of an eighth inch hardboard, we make a template for cutting the 18 holes out of the steel end plates. The hardboard acts a guide for the plasma cutter to cut the holes. The pipes for the heat exchanger are cut 31 and half inches long. Half inch sticks out at both the ends of the heater. They are welded to the steel end plates at both ends. The opening for the door at the end of the heater for the wood intake has a dimension of 16 inch X 12 inch . A similar template is placed on the end plate and the opening is cut using the plasma cutter. A frame around the door is made using a three quarter inch by three sixteenths inch flat stock .This is used for the door opening and to give the door something to close up against. Hinges are welded near the door opening for attaching the door. The locking mechanism for the door to hold it shut is made using a flat stock and couple of bolts . The bolts are welded onto the flat stock and attached inside the heater just beside the door . The handle made of a 90 degree round stock is welded to couple of washers and the door is sandwiched in between. The end plates along with the door is welded onto the body of the heater at both the ends and a hole is made at the top of the propane tank body for installing the flue exhaust pipe. A small hole is cut near the door and a damper in the form of a simple sliding door is attached to the hole that will control the airflow into the heater. A section from old 55 gallon steel barrel is cut and welded onto the backside of the heater .An inexpensive fan blower is attached to this 55 gallon drum . This is installed to concentrate the air that is going through the heat exchanger pipes. The flue pipe is welded onto the top of the heater so that the harmful smoke and gases escape through the exhaust . A grate is placed into the heater through the door opening , wood pieces are introduced and the we start firing the heater. After few minutes , the fire will heat the heat exchanger pipes . The fan blower is turned on and the hot air is blown through the pipes into the garage . https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-gwiT7Ps1F0