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RECENT POSTS YOU MIGHT LIKE
  • How to build a Simple and Efficient Homemade Water Distiller for cheap .Great for everyday use or in emergency/off-grid situations.
    This project goes into the build of a homemade DIY Water distiller that can purify dirty and contaminated water and desalinate salt water into clean drinking water. The total cost of this build is about sixty dollars. For distilling water, you need three thing - water, a source of heat, and some sort of apparatus that will allow water to boil into steam and then recollect that steam , condensing it back into usable water. A water distiller basically needs to do two things, it needs to boil water to create steam, and it needs to capture that steam in a way that allows it to condense back into water. The materials you need to build this distiller are six quart stainless steel pressure cooker, 20 foot three eighth inch copper tubing, two gallon bucket, jb weld, zip ties, flat bar, five sixteenth inch silicon tubing, mason jar. The first step is to boil the contaminated water in a tea kettle or a pressure cooker. Here we use a six quart stainless steel pressure cooker. Since the boiling water must be directed to the condenser, something with a sealed lid of some sort is needed. The existing pressure valve of the cooker is removed and replaced with a barbed fitting .A small rubber O ring gasket is used to tighten the new fitting. Next step is to make the condenser. The purpose of a condenser is to give steam the opportunity to cool back down enough so that it turns back into liquid water. The condenser is built using a 20 foot three eighth inch copper tubing. This is reformed into a tighter and taller coil such it will fit into a two gallon bucket. Because it needs some sort of support to avoid having the coil collapse under its own weight, a flat bar bent into a U shape is placed under the coil. A small cross piece is attached to it at the bottom using JB weld. The coil is attached to the punched bar with some zip ties. A hole is drilled near the bottom of the bucket to allow the copper tube to drain out the condensed water . The coil is placed inside the bucket carefully and the tail end of the coil is pushed into the drain hole . The condenser is connected to the pressure cooker with a 5/16th inch silicon tubing. A similar silicon tubing connects the bottom of the condenser to the clean water receptacle like a mason jar. When distilling water , cooling the steam back down is very important. The coil itself will cool some of that down. But that alone isn't enough at this scale. It will end up losing a lot of steam through the bottom of the condenser because not all of it has been able to cool and condense by the time it reaches the bottom. An efficient way is to add a cooling element to the condenser. Filling the bucket with ice water will increase the efficiency and water output by a lot because it will cool the copper tubing much more than air alone. Doing so had an immediate effect and all of the escaping steam condensed instantly to liquid water. By periodically adding cold water through the distillation process, it practically eliminated all of the steam waste coming out of the condenser. The gap around the copper tube where the hole is drilled is not sealed. This is because of two reasons. The first being able to easily remove the condenser from the bucket for cleaning and maintenance. The second reason being it acts as a drain. The boiling steam causes the copper tubing to get very hot. Because of this, it heats up the cool water very quickly and this drain makes it convenient in that the water will drain out before it gets to that point. In a survival situation , set the condenser over a larger bucket to collect and reuse the cooling water as it drained out and not simply let it go to waste. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PrfDskR2I5g
  • DIY Video:How to build a Homemade Double Barrel Garage Heater out of Old Water Tanks .Efficient,clean burn and cheap!
    This project goes over the build of Double Barrel Stove out of two old scrap water heaters for the shop. The first step is to disassemble both the old electric hot water heaters to get their tanks out. Take a grinder and cut a section off from the top of the water heater tank. This tank will become the bottom tank. Remove any calcium and mineral that ends up developing deposits inside the bottom of the tank. Take a 12 gauge plate steel and put our top drum upside down and scribe a circle out of them from the end and cut it. Weld the steel piece onto the drum. You need to do the same for the other drum too because with these double barrels, you are basically making two stoves, just connecting them in the middle. Now both the top tank and bottom tank ends have been polished and cleaned .Remove any insulations, paints and glues from them if they have any. Make sure all the rough pieces on the tank are welded on ground down. Cut a small piece of pipe that acts as stack between the 2 tank. Next step is to add a small support bracket on the top of the bottom tank that will help support the top tank. Cut a hole on the bottom tank .This will be where the stack goes between two of them. Fill the drain plug down at the bottom . Take the top tank, cut and weld the top exhaust stack that will be six inch outlet for the smoke. We also add a six inch inlet that goes up to the top that forces your your smoke and the gas has to go across the length of the barrel. The bottom barrel will be connected to this. Both barrels are welded together, the bottom barrel is welded onto the mid stack which connects the top barrel with the exhaust stack. In order to support the barrels, we take the scrap pipes lying around and make legs as a support structure for the stove. Next is the door fabrication. We cut a hole for the door in the bottom barrel. A couple of hinges, door catch are welded on to this end. An air inlet pipe is threaded onto a plate. The whole unit is then attached to the door. A handle is attached to the inlet pipe so you can open and close whenever you want to control the flow of the air intake. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fTj4pjJ4DT0
  • How to build an DIY 12 V Portable Water Pump Box with filtration system for Outdoor Survival / RV
    This project goes into the build of an offgrid portable water pump and filtration system that can turn any water from your creek,lake,river into safe and clean drinking water . This 12V portable system can be powered by solar or from your car directly and is ideal for camping , RV or outdoor survival enthusiasts. This system enables them to pump water from a fresh water source, filter and then store or use in case of emergency survival situation. The materials you need to build this portable filtration system are as follows. A tactix storage box to lodge the water pump,inlet and outlet hoses, an inline water filter or twin carbon 0.5micron filter, pex pipe, garden hose pipes, 12mill barb strainer,rocker switch ,12V Shurflo water pump with the flow rate of 11 litres per minute, 50 amp Anderson plug and 10m heavy duty wire ,basic tools such as wire cutters, long nose pliers, solder. The first step is completing the wiring for the water pump inside the tactix tool box. The rocker switch , the Anderson plug and a 7.5 Amp inline fuse are wired. The 12V rocker toggle switch is mounted at the center of the box lid. The power input plug or the Anderson plug is mounted to the left of the switch. This input plug connects to the car battery or a solar battery. The positive red wires from the switch is connected to the Anderson plug through an inline fuse .The negative black wire from the plug goes straight to the switch. The remaining wires from the switch is then connected to the water pump which will be installed later. The wires are covered with corrugated split tubing to ensure that it is protected and safe. The filter strainer is installed on the inlet side of the pump using an elbow, thread tapes. The strainer will filter out any unwanted debris before it goes to the pump. Couple of holes are drilled into to the side of the box where the inlet and the outlet hoses will connect the water pump. The male fitting are attached to the holes before the pump is installed. The pump is placed inside the box and mounted securely in such a way that the elbows are facing towards the two holes for the exterior hoses that was just made at the side of the box. Once the pump is mounted ,we connect the red and black wires coming from the switch to the positive and negative connections of the pump. The wires are once again covered with corrugated split tubing for safety. To connect the pump with the hose outlets , we measure the distance between the outlets and the pump and connect two pex pipes . Heat was applied to the pipe for bending and moulding them to connect the outlets. The 10 metre 50 Amp Anderson plug extension heavy duty cable wire is connected to the power source .Here the power draw is from a car battery. The other end is connected the input anderson plug on the top side of the box. The inlet hose with the strainer attached is placed sitting midway into the water source .The other end of the hose is connected to the intake pipe coming from the pump inside the box. The The other hose is connected to the outlet pipe coming from the water pump inside the box. At the end of the hose , we connect an inline water filter or a twin carbon filter . The carbon filter ensures that there is no sediments or debris inside the water and also helps to eliminate bacteria and other contaminants. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bLiTn8YacWo