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This video shows the build of a Water Pump From Scrap .Today I dig into our scrap pile to come up with enough parts to build ourselves a gasoline powered water pump. I first start off with an old gear pump I had laying around, then I salvage an old pressure washer base to mount everything on. To power this water pump I use that two horse engine I bought at a yard sale. build everything out of free find junk that would have gone to landfill or scraped, at least these useful parts can now have a new lease on life.
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This Video shows the build of a Homemade 12VDC Mini Box Fan! w/motor speed control!Powered with a 12v battery or 12v solar panel! Made Sturdy and is SUPER POWERFUL! pushes more air than a fan twice its size.Ithas a whopping 1500 CFM air-flow volume with wind speeds measuring in at over 20 MPH! (32 kph) and with the motor control switch you can set it to run at any of 100 different speeds! .Great for off-grid use, camping, emergencies or everyday use. tip: run it from a cars’ 12v cigarette lighter plug.[/vc_wp_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]



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  • DIY Video : How to build a simple Off Grid Refrigerator using a 5 gallon bucket . No Ice Needed !!
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These are done to fit in the titanium stove pipe and for the gravity fed hopper system. We use a three inch propane fuel cylinder tube to make a pipe collar as a guide to trace out the holes. These pipe collars acts as hopper support for gravity fed pellet mechanism and for securing the stove pipe. The hole for the first pipe is about five and half inches away from the door hinge and the second one , one and half inches away. The holes are then cut using a jigsaw. The flanges in the stove pipe collars are made by securing them against a wooden fixture and bent them using a hammer. The edges are heated with a torch to anneal the metal for hardening. Before inserting the stove collars into the lid, the metal sheet inside the lid was removed. Using fiber glass cloth, a smoke seal is made around the collars. The collars are then inserted and the metal sheet is reinstated with help of some stainless steel rivets. 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