DIY Video : How to Turn old unused ceiling fans into a useful energy producer by building a Wind Turbine out of it


    A Beginner tutorial on how to make a wind turbine ceiling fan.So out of the box, we have the main part here, which has the motor in it.Keep up with all the blades if you can. You can use this for the furrow on the back the way it pushes around to keep the turbine from standing in a very aggressive wind it pushes it out of the way

    First part is just getting the motor outside of this casing. And you want to be careful because these wires are fragile, and you don’t want to tear those loose by any means.So mainly, the tools that you’ll need is just a screwdriver, maybe a flathead screwdriver and a hammer eventually.

    Take the top part of the ceiling fan off, this is the part that’s next to the ceiling.Disconnect the wires don’t cut them.

    There’s a nut here with a washer that holds this plate.And we don’t want this plate. So we need to take that off. However, we do want the washers here.


    Take this casing apart, and inside you’ll see that copper coils that actually power the fan.

    The next step is finding the highest arm reading of these four wires that is coming out of this motor.Pull that higest ohm reading wires through the center pole to the other side.

    Insert a metal banding used for attaching the magnets around the stator.

    Put the magnets inside the fan housing to achieve a voltage reading.Add a cardboard spacer in there so that the magnets are aligned with the stator.

    The blades are made of 4 inch PVC.You can find templates online for the blades.Put the outline of the blades from the paper onto the PVC and then cut it out with a jigsaw. And then once you cut it out with a jigsaw, all you have to do is get a little Sander out, you can use a hand Sander to smooth the edges off.

    Connect the blades to the faceplate of the old ceiling fan.

    Next step is to take an inch galvanised pipe that forms the body of the turbine. A 40 inch piece will slide down into the conduit of the mounting system for your turbine.A 30 inch piece on the back,This is going to be angled up into the wind to keep the blades in the wind a little better.

    One Inch PVC is slid down the end of the 30 inch pipe and attach the tail piece on there which is made of fan blade

    The wires from the fan is passed through the pipe and just zip tie them down.Cut the PVC in half to a 45 degree elbow ,cut a line down through this PVC, we’re gonna split it basically and drill some holes in it and attach the ceiling fan blade.

    Attach the fan to the galvanized pipe with the help of an extension that was previously saved during our dismantling of the ceiling fan.Use JB weld on the inside of that. And I put this bolt through this part and put a tightening screw on it, they’re kind of digs into the metal.

    Connect the two leads from the fan to a bell wire, solder these two together, wrap it up with some electrical tape and kind of zip tie to the top so that it will stay in place.At the base end of the wire,connect it with a diode bridge rectifier which is further connected to our battery.

    Regarding connecting the rectifier,it doesnt matter how you solder them together,just as long as they are separate and not connecting and shorting out.

    But you want to put this at the base of the wire at the very end so that you can put this inside of your battery box and hook it up to your battery.



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