DIY Video : How to build an Off Grid Water Heater – Hot Water with DIY Firestove

    NEED HOT water? Camping, off grid, this Off Grid Water Heater is the unit to have!.It has given my off grid home comfort and HOT water! VERY simple setup and very economical.Water heating is essential not only for comfort off the grid, but for survival.Hot water is definitely a luxury that you miss when you actually have to go without.In most homes your hot water heater is consuming energy day and night, 24-7. Most hot water heaters are set to keep the water hot at all times, even while you are in bed. This can be quite wasteful. And with the rising energy costs, many people are looking for alternatives,this Off Grid Water Heater can be really helpful.

    Watch the DIY Outdoor Off Grid Water Heater build video



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