DIY Video : How to build a Powerful Mini Box fan for or off-grid use, camping, emergencies or everyday use


    This Video shows the build of a Homemade 12VDC Mini Box Fan! w/motor speed control!Powered with a 12v battery or 12v solar panel! Made Sturdy and is SUPER POWERFUL! pushes more air than a fan twice its size.Ithas a whopping 1500 CFM air-flow volume with wind speeds measuring in at over 20 MPH! (32 kph) and with the motor control switch you can set it to run at any of 100 different speeds! .Great for off-grid use, camping, emergencies or everyday use. tip: run it from a cars’ 12v cigarette lighter plug.

    Watch the DIY Homemade 12VDC Mini Box Fan Build Video



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