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  • DIY Video:How to build a Simple Battery Backup Power Station for Emergency Power
    This project goes over the setup of a simple battery bank for your offgrid applications. We use three AGM batteries, and they're about 245 amp hours each.Marine or deep cycle batteries also work. Dont get a car battery.Make sure that the batteries are about same age or they start bringing each other down. The wires are connected through the positive ports and negative ports of each batteries. The positive from the inverter is connected to the positive of the first battery .Negative from the inverter is connected to the negative of the 3rd battery. The battery chargers are from Pros Series DSR.It ramps up the optimum charging voltage. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zxvo3t898xI
  • How to build a Backyard Waste Oil Burner Powered Water Heater to produce Free Hot Water for your Home
    This projects goes over the build of waste oil powered free hot water heater for your home .This converts an old used domestic water heater to run on waste oil, engine oil or cooking oil. With as little as one liter of waste oil, this heater gives twice the heat output than a domestic electric powered water heater .As waste oil is free, this is more economical than running on gas or electric. The setup of this waste oil heater is very simple and easy. We have a waste oil burner that is placed under the domestic water heater. The burner is connected to a blower from a car. This blower is powered by a 12V battery charger . The burner is also connected to a drip feed waste oil pipe through a small pipe. The oil feed from a suspended tank, which gives it a gravity feed dribbles into the inlet pipe on the burner and it is simply blown into the burner by the force of the air from the blower. To control the oil flow ,we have a valve on the oil tank. The cold water comes into through the inlet hose at the bottom of the tank . From there burner just fires the heat up through the center of the heater as it would normally if it was gas fired. The hot water comes out from a outlet hose at the top of the tank. The waste oil burner is made out an old fire extinguisher bottle. The beauty of using extinguisher bottles is you don't have to worry about any flammable gases in them, and the metal seems to be quite durable. Make sure that the air and the fuel enter the bottle at a slight angle in order to create some swirling. This makes sure that the air and the fuel mix and will burn completely. And also that the bottle is kept hot so that the liquid oil will vaporize and the gas will burn. The inlet pipe for the waste oil and the blower is positioned at 25 to 35% of the way up to the bottle. The inlet pipe has a small bend in it so as to promote swirling within the bottle. This is important in keeping the bottle hot and self sustaining. The burner has a clean burn with almost no smoke. The output of the oil burner can be controlled by the amount of waste oil being dripped into the burner and by the amount of air blown into it. This oil gas burner is more powerful than a gas burner and the heat produced can overpower the heat sink threshold of the water heater . A vent line is installed on the system so that any build up pressure can be released. Apart from heating hot water , this set up can be used for space heating , pool heating or garage heating. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L4xq_GSjWLI
  • How to Dig a Shallow Well from Start to Finish for offgrid homesteading
    This project goes over how you can dig your own shallow well using simple tools that you can get from your local garden store. The materials you need to dig and install a well are as follows. A customized Seymour AUA2 Post Auger to dig the hole. A Shovel is used to move the pea gravel and dirt out of the way. A Four inch casing PVC pipe that is going into the hole that is dug and this is going to hold the water until you need it. One and one fourth inch threaded adapter. This connects the bottom of the casing pipe to the foot valve. The foot valve is one and one quarter inch. This valve allows the water to come in and not go out. This helps to keep the pump primed. A water well pump pipe which is basically a one and one quarter inch PVC pipe. This will pull the water from the bottom of the well bringing it to your pump. The length of this pipe is going to be determined by how deep your well is. It should be at least a foot shorter than the depth of your well. You don't want this pipe sitting on the bottom because it would just be sitting in sediment and it will be clogging things up. A pitcher pump that has a one and one quarter inch threaded water inlet at the bottom. A closet flange. It makes mounting the pump to the top of your well four inch casing pipe very easy and it also helps keep things clean. Basically you would just set this inside you your four inch pipe, drill a hole out of the middle of a board, screw that to the top of this flange then mount your pump to the board that you have fastened to this. A one and one quarter inch threaded adapter. This will screw into the bottom of your pitcher pump and in turn, it will connect to the pipe bringing water to your pump from the bottom of the well. Teflon tape, PVC glue. Pea gravel - This will go down around the casing pipe of the well. The amount of pea gravel you need is determined by the depth of the well and water height. Quikcrete or aerated concrete to cap the top of the well. This prevents groundwater contamination and keeps stuff from finding a way to easily get into your well. To find the spot for the well, we use couple of coat hangers as dowsing roads. We take a drinking straw ,cut it in half and slide it over the coat hangers. This helps us in not using our hands or fingers influence while dowsing. Also it is easy to rotate the rods within the straws. The rods are kept parallel to the ground . If the rods cross each other , then mark the spot on the ground directly down the cross . This is the ideal spot for the well. The auger used for digging the hole for the well is modified from the default Seymour Post hole auger. We use a custom 5 foot 11 gauge one and half inch square tubing as the extension for the auger . The handle of the auger is a three foot three quarter inch pipe welded to a four inch 11 gauge square tubing. We start digging into the the spot that we have found earlier using the dowsing rods. Pay attention to the changes in the color of sand , because that can give you clues as whether you are getting closer to water. We extend the auger using the square bar tube once the auger handle is near the ground. Once you have hit wet clay, there is going to be suction around. We twist and pull at the same time to get the auger out of the hole in this situation. Next, we put the 20 foot PVC casing pipe into the hole . We cut slots using a reciprocating saw on the pipe one foot from the bottom of the well to the top of the water level to allow the water to flow into the well. Pea gravel is poured around the sides of the pipe all the way up to the slots . The remaining hole area around the pipe is packed with sand and clay. We seal the well by packing it around the sides with quickrete cement. This helps the water not to be able to run down into your well but around it. We lower the one and one quarter inch well pump pipe with the foot valve at the end into the PVC casing pipe. A four inch drain flange is secured on top of the casing pipe . A pitcher pump is then attached to top of the pipe. To prevent the pump from moving, it is bolted to the board where the flange is installed. To prime the well, we pour some water down through the pitcher pump. Pump out the dirty water until it is clean. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5rYPRMm8Arw