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RECENT POSTS YOU MIGHT LIKE
  • DIY Video : How to Turn old unused ceiling fans into a useful energy producer by building a Wind Turbine out of it
    A Beginner tutorial on how to make a wind turbine ceiling fan.So out of the box, we have the main part here, which has the motor in it.Keep up with all the blades if you can. You can use this for the furrow on the back the way it pushes around to keep the turbine from standing in a very aggressive wind it pushes it out of the way First part is just getting the motor outside of this casing. And you want to be careful because these wires are fragile, and you don't want to tear those loose by any means.So mainly, the tools that you'll need is just a screwdriver, maybe a flathead screwdriver and a hammer eventually. Take the top part of the ceiling fan off, this is the part that's next to the ceiling.Disconnect the wires don't cut them. There's a nut here with a washer that holds this plate.And we don't want this plate. So we need to take that off. However, we do want the washers here. Take this casing apart, and inside you'll see that copper coils that actually power the fan. The next step is finding the highest arm reading of these four wires that is coming out of this motor.Pull that higest ohm reading wires through the center pole to the other side. Insert a metal banding used for attaching the magnets around the stator. Put the magnets inside the fan housing to achieve a voltage reading.Add a cardboard spacer in there so that the magnets are aligned with the stator. The blades are made of 4 inch PVC.You can find templates online for the blades.Put the outline of the blades from the paper onto the PVC and then cut it out with a jigsaw. And then once you cut it out with a jigsaw, all you have to do is get a little Sander out, you can use a hand Sander to smooth the edges off. Connect the blades to the faceplate of the old ceiling fan. Next step is to take an inch galvanised pipe that forms the body of the turbine. A 40 inch piece will slide down into the conduit of the mounting system for your turbine.A 30 inch piece on the back,This is going to be angled up into the wind to keep the blades in the wind a little better. One Inch PVC is slid down the end of the 30 inch pipe and attach the tail piece on there which is made of fan blade The wires from the fan is passed through the pipe and just zip tie them down.Cut the PVC in half to a 45 degree elbow ,cut a line down through this PVC, we're gonna split it basically and drill some holes in it and attach the ceiling fan blade. Attach the fan to the galvanized pipe with the help of an extension that was previously saved during our dismantling of the ceiling fan.Use JB weld on the inside of that. And I put this bolt through this part and put a tightening screw on it, they're kind of digs into the metal. Connect the two leads from the fan to a bell wire, solder these two together, wrap it up with some electrical tape and kind of zip tie to the top so that it will stay in place.At the base end of the wire,connect it with a diode bridge rectifier which is further connected to our battery. Regarding connecting the rectifier,it doesnt matter how you solder them together,just as long as they are separate and not connecting and shorting out. But you want to put this at the base of the wire at the very end so that you can put this inside of your battery box and hook it up to your battery. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sr9ZMbF3Zqk&list=PL68TKRSLgXzQqZa5WzMNFwmYKS4b4KPcA
  • How to build a DIY Passive Solar Thermal Water Heater. Simple and Efficient!!
    This project goes into the build of a passive solar thermal water heater using pex pipes and 4 X 8 plywood piece. The pex pipes are sturdy and tough , doesn't easily leak. This passive solar heater can reach upto 120 - 150 F on a typical sunny day. Instead of pex pipes, you can use cheap irrigation pipe for this project. The pex pipes are more stronger and durable . The heater can be used for heating your domestic water, space or room heating or just heating a swimming pool. The box that contains the pipes are made of 4 X 4 plywood . Four pieces of 2 X 4 pressure treated lumber are joined along the sides using screws to make the frame. We staple in some bubble insulation along the dimensions of the box . Since the insulation material is silver, it will reflect heat. To avoid this ,we coat it with a flat black paint to attract the solar heat. Two holes are drilled on the sides of the frame for the inlet end of the pipe where the cold water comes in and outlet end where the hot water comes out. The inside and the outside of the heater is painted flat back using rust-oleum high heat paint to absorb maximum heat from the sun. The first layer of half inch pex tubes or irrigation pipes are secured inside the solar heater box using half inch pex talon clamps. The clamps are installed on four sides of the box securing each loop of the pipe. The second or upper layer of pipes are secured in using zip ties. The total length of the pipe is 200ft. The pipe comes in through the inlet hole and goes to the outside on the first layer , all the way around and work itself inside .It then goes through the top layer and all the way to the outside and then exit through the outlet hole. The bottom layer pipes aren't going to be exposed to the sun as much but they still will be warmed up because the whole box is covered with lexan polycarbonate sheet. The top layer with the pipe that goes outside through the outlet hole will have the highest thermal BTU. A very inexpensive reed thermometer with a 4 inch stem is installed on the side of the heater using a half inch to three eighths bushing reducer . A 4 X 8 Makrolon Polycarbonate Sheet is placed on top of the heater box and secured down in place using a No 8 One and one fourth sheet metal screws ,finishing washers and rubber grommets. Silicon adhesives are used to seal the gap formed between the sheet and the box frame. The Solar thermal heater is placed at an angle of 20 degrees. This is done with the help of leg supports with dimensions 16 and 8 inches 2 X 4 pieces at both the sides. A 50 watt Renogy Solar Panel is also installed adjacent to the heater. This Solar Panel is for powering the bilge water pump. A 500GPH 12V bilge pump is used to pump the cold water through the pipes into the heater . In order to control the flow of water through the pump , it is connected to an speed control electric circuit box which has a relay, a buck boost converter,a motor pump speed controller, potentiometer and a switch. The pump is powered by a 50W Solar Panel .The negative connection from the panel is connected to the relay, the positive goes to the switch. The relay determines the voltage for the buck boost converter .It activates on a certain voltage we set and then powers the buck boost converter. The buck boost converter will keep a constant voltage no matter what the voltage the solar panel is putting out. It is then connected to a 15 amp motor pump speed controller and a potentiometer which is used to control the voltage of the bilge pump motor. The 12V 500GPH bilge pump is connected to the motor pump speed controller. In order to test the unit, we place the heater near a pool to heat it. The bilge pump is submerged into the pool which is then connected to the heater with help of a PVC hose. The output pvc hose is returned with heated water back to the pool. The water reaches upto 140 F based on our test. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbzeOtpXZbGiesna9w4eLuGzWvCQah1-h
  • How to Recycle Old Used Laptop Batteries to make a DIY 24V 72AH Emergency Backup Battery System
    This project goes into the build of a 1.72kwh emergency backup battery system out of old and used laptop batteries and an old military surplus ammo box. The materials you need to build this project are lithium ion 18650 batteries from old laptops, 4X5,3X5 cell holders, ammo can, 40 Amp BMS or Battery management system, spot welder, fused nickel strip, heat shrink, kapton tape. First we determine how many batteries that we can pack inside the ammo box. In our case, we have 2 packs of 91 18650 cells , a total of 182 cells. We take the 4 X5 and 3 X 5 cell holders and connect them to make a couple of 7 x 13 cell holders. To make this 24V lithium ion battery , we need a 7S ( 7 cells in series connection) combination . A single lithium ion cell has a nominal voltage of 3.7V . To make a single long 7S configuration battery , we connect 7 groups of 26 cells in series to get the 25V nominal voltage. The cells used in the build are Samsung ICR18650 - 28A with a capacity of 2800Mah .The cells are rewrapped with heat shrink and added an insulator disk at the positive side of the cell for safety. The cells are installed on the holder in such a way that the first 26 cells are in a same polarity and are connected in parallel. Next 26 cells are installed with opposite polarity and is the connected in series with the first 26 cells . The rest of the cells are connected in the similar way to make a final 7S 2P ( 7 series and 2 Parallel ) configuration with max capacity of 26 X 2.8mah or 72.8 amp hours. A four wide fused nickel strip is used to connect the batteries in series. The nickel strip is placed over the first 4 cells and spot welded in place using the sunkko spot welder. Each cell is individually fused in case there is short circuit or malfunction. The nickel strip connects the first two rows in parallel and then connects the next two rows in series . Similarly, to complete the series connections, the nickel strips are placed and welded on the opposite side of the pack in such a way that it wont short out the connection by coming in contact with the most negative side of the battery. We take 0.15mm standard nickel strips to connect the positive ends of the whole pack together. The last 2 rows of most positive end are connected together using the nickel strip . Small pieces of nickel strips are placed across these two rows to connect them in parallel . The pieces are bent so that it can be connected to a separate copper busbar. The separate 2 battery pack of 7 X 13 cells are connected together by the nickel fuse strip in such a way that one of the pack is flipped on top of the other. The nickel strip that connects the first 3 connection on the 1st pack is bent to connect the 4th connection on the other pack. A 90 degree bent on the last row of the 4p fused nickel strip is welded on to the first battery pack. A piece of kapton tape is placed over the nickel strip to insulate it and hold it together. The bent nickel strip on the first pack is placed on the other pack is such a way that the fuses are perfectly aligned . Then it is welded using a spot welder. A one sixteenth inch ABS plastic is placed in between the two packs. The second pack is now slowly folded over the top of the first pack. The whole pack is then wrapped around with the kapton tape so that it doesn't move around. The last three unconnected terminals on one side of the battery pack is connected to the single row of unconnected terminal on the other side with help of four nickel strips. The 4p fused nickel strip is cut to connect the 3 sides and the other side. To connect the main negative and the positive tabs , we attach a THHN copper wire across the both the terminal ends. The extended nickel connections are folded across the wire to hold it into place and soldered . The terminal wires are then connected together with XT90 connector. Next step is to connect the BMS or Battery management system to the pack . This is a small circuit board which is used to protect each cells of the battery pack from overcharging and becoming unbalanced and getting damaged. It stop the over draining when the cells are fully charged. The BMS used here is a 7S 24V with charge current of 20A and discharge current of 40A. It has two negative leads, one connecting the battery and the other for charging and discharging. The BMS also has 8 sense or balancing wires which are connected to each series connections on the battery. The black wire is connected to the most negative terminal of the battery. The first red wire is connected to the first series connected group of cells, the second red wire is connected to the second series connected cells and so on. The last red wire is connected to the main positive terminal of the battery. A heat shrink is wrapped around the whole battery pack for added safety . Before inserting the battery pack into the ammo box, a hole is drilled on the back side of the ammo can to allow the cables from the battery to pass through. Also a small piece of one sixteenth inch ABS plastic is placed at the bottom of the ammo box as a support and insulation. The battery is slowly dropped into the box . The BMS is placed on the top and is connected to the XT90 connector and the balance wires from the battery. The B- terminal on the BMS is connected to the XT90 connector on the battery. The black wire on the BMS is the charge and discharge lead. To provide extra insulation between the battery pack and the the ammo box ,we attach two pieces of the insulting ABS sheet on either side of the box. The lid is put back on the box and the battery build is complete.