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    A Beginner tutorial on how to make a wind turbine ceiling fan.So out of the box, we have the main part here, which has the motor in it.Keep up with all the blades if you can. You can use this for the furrow on the back the way it pushes around to keep the turbine from standing in a very aggressive wind it pushes it out of the way First part is just getting the motor outside of this casing. And you want to be careful because these wires are fragile, and you don't want to tear those loose by any means.So mainly, the tools that you'll need is just a screwdriver, maybe a flathead screwdriver and a hammer eventually. Take the top part of the ceiling fan off, this is the part that's next to the ceiling.Disconnect the wires don't cut them. There's a nut here with a washer that holds this plate.And we don't want this plate. So we need to take that off. However, we do want the washers here. Take this casing apart, and inside you'll see that copper coils that actually power the fan. The next step is finding the highest arm reading of these four wires that is coming out of this motor.Pull that higest ohm reading wires through the center pole to the other side. Insert a metal banding used for attaching the magnets around the stator. Put the magnets inside the fan housing to achieve a voltage reading.Add a cardboard spacer in there so that the magnets are aligned with the stator. The blades are made of 4 inch PVC.You can find templates online for the blades.Put the outline of the blades from the paper onto the PVC and then cut it out with a jigsaw. And then once you cut it out with a jigsaw, all you have to do is get a little Sander out, you can use a hand Sander to smooth the edges off. Connect the blades to the faceplate of the old ceiling fan. Next step is to take an inch galvanised pipe that forms the body of the turbine. A 40 inch piece will slide down into the conduit of the mounting system for your turbine.A 30 inch piece on the back,This is going to be angled up into the wind to keep the blades in the wind a little better. One Inch PVC is slid down the end of the 30 inch pipe and attach the tail piece on there which is made of fan blade The wires from the fan is passed through the pipe and just zip tie them down.Cut the PVC in half to a 45 degree elbow ,cut a line down through this PVC, we're gonna split it basically and drill some holes in it and attach the ceiling fan blade. Attach the fan to the galvanized pipe with the help of an extension that was previously saved during our dismantling of the ceiling fan.Use JB weld on the inside of that. And I put this bolt through this part and put a tightening screw on it, they're kind of digs into the metal. Connect the two leads from the fan to a bell wire, solder these two together, wrap it up with some electrical tape and kind of zip tie to the top so that it will stay in place.At the base end of the wire,connect it with a diode bridge rectifier which is further connected to our battery. Regarding connecting the rectifier,it doesnt matter how you solder them together,just as long as they are separate and not connecting and shorting out. But you want to put this at the base of the wire at the very end so that you can put this inside of your battery box and hook it up to your battery. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sr9ZMbF3Zqk&list=PL68TKRSLgXzQqZa5WzMNFwmYKS4b4KPcA
  • DIY Video : How to build a DIY Pex Coil Solar Thermal Water Heater. Simple and Efficient!!
    This video shows the build of a Simple Pex Coil Solar Thermal Water Heater.asy DIY! No Soldering, Clamps, Crimp Rings, Glues, Unions, or that expensive crimping tool! in my design it's just 2 push-to-fit "shark-bite" connectors! (located outside of collector) and because it's all one piece of tube, the unit has no potential internal leak points.PEX is sturdy, tough and rigid. water temp rating range... 33F to 185F-200F (93°C) water! ...and if temps hit or fall below 32F (0°C) it's freeze damage resistant! it'll freeze but doesn't break. the connectors are made to last at least 25 years and pipe is rated 50+ years.

    Watch the DIY Homemade Solar Thermal PEX COIL Water Heater Build Video

  • How to build a Homemade Micro Wind Turbine for under $50 that can be mounted anywhere
    This project goes in the detail on how to build a mini wind turbine..The wind turbine is a nice addition to your solar generator system for times when it’s cloudy and you are not receiving as much sunlight as you normally First step is to build some cheap PVC blades, what kind of motor we're going to be using and how we're going to attach this to the motor. We are making six blades or rotors here.What we want to do is we want to cut our PVC pipe to length first. Once you've got it cut to length, then you want to take your your straight edge again and and Marco line down the center and cut it in half. Make sure that you do that on both sides. One on this side, one on this side. And that they're perfectly in the middle so that you'll get two even sides. We need to cut a small little block down at the blade end, where we are going to put a drill hole and put a screw through it so that it attaches to the hub.On the top of the blade, we're going to cut away some of the material to resemble a swept wing, kind of at an angle. These are 14 inch long blades that is attached to the hub using set screws attached to the motor. The 12V motor used here is a 300 RPM geared motor which would be its maximum speed and it produces 600 milliamps when its fully loaded. The motor is placed inside a One and half inch PVC pipe ,another PVC Tee is connected from where the wires will down to the bottom where another 7 foot pipe that act as the tower or pole. The end of the pole goes into a shower drain which is then attached to piece of wood that acts a solid base. For the YAW system at the back end,a tail vane is made of a cheap flashing material that is bolted between an 8 inch piece of PVC.Put a hole through the middle of it with a bolt in between so that it can't move anywhere. We use an an old OSB for the base, size is about seven inches square. And then I just have a piece of treated lumber on the bottom. It's attached to this ball bearings so it can spin around. The Shower drain PVC is placed in the middle through some ball bearings. Route the wiring down through the hole for to connect to the charge controller. Next step is the wiring through the piping.We just need to connect these terminals to the appropriate sides of the motor. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6UZ2WtXlVoc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fjHW78bMUoY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c7a9RSzZKcE