Privacy Policy

Privacy Policy
My Blog takes your privacy seriously. This privacy policy describes what personal information we collect and how we use it. See this privacy policy primer to learn more about privacy policies in general.

Routine Information Collection
All web servers track basic information about their visitors. This information includes, but is not limited to, IP addresses, browser details, timestamps and referring pages. None of this information can personally identify specific visitors to this site. The information is tracked for routine administration and maintenance purposes.

Cookies and Web Beacons
Where necessary, My Blog uses cookies to store information about a visitor’s preferences and history in order to better serve the visitor and/or present the visitor with customized content.

Advertising partners and other third parties may also use cookies, scripts and/or web beacons to track visitors to our site in order to display advertisements and other useful information. Such tracking is done directly by the third parties through their own servers and is subject to their own privacy policies.

Controlling Your Privacy
Note that you can change your browser settings to disable cookies if you have privacy concerns. Disabling cookies for all sites is not recommended as it may interfere with your use of some sites. The best option is to disable or enable cookies on a per-site basis. Consult your browser documentation for instructions on how to block cookies and other tracking mechanisms. This list of web browser privacy management links may also be useful.

Special Note About Google Advertising
Any advertisements served by Google, Inc., and affiliated companies may be controlled using cookies. These cookies allow Google to display ads based on your visits to this site and other sites that use Google advertising services. Learn how to opt out of Google’s cookie usage. As mentioned above, any tracking done by Google through cookies and other mechanisms is subject to Google’s own privacy policies.

Contact Information
Concerns or questions about this privacy policy can be directed to admin@practicalsurvivalist.com for further clarification.

This privacy policy was generated by the Privacy Policy for WordPress plugin.



RECENT POSTS YOU MIGHT LIKE
  • How to build a Cheap Waste oil Barrel Heater for your Garage .Generate Free Heat from Used Oil
    This project goes over the build of a homemade waste oil garage heater made out of an old standard 55 gallon drum and a propane tank. This setup also doubles as a cooker. The first step is to make the Waste Oil Burner Unit. This is made out of a four inch tin can and a candy tin. Place the tin can in the center of the candy tin and mark around them. Cut a hole out of it with a chisel. Drill around 15 small holes around the tin can. The tin can acts like a chimney brining fresh air for the combustion. The open end of the tin is placed into the hole at the center of the candy tin. This burner uses a little over two liters of used waste oil per hour and makes lots of heat from that amount of oil. Make sure that the propane tank is empty. Fill it with water and let it sit for a day before we begin to disassemble them. Once the tank is safe to work with, we begin by cutting two sections on the them and divide it into two chambers .The top one is seven inches high and the bottom one is three inches. We also cut two openings at the top of the tank for exhaust fumes. We make a disc separator out a 4mm steel plate with a hole in the middle. This disc goes in between the upper and the lower chamber. We place the tin can burner unit inside the upper chamber . The lower chamber is for the air intake. Doors are made with the leftover cut pieces of the tank . The door for the upper chamber has a screen welded onto them for viewing purposes. The air for the combustion comes through the lower chamber ,passes through the disc separator hole and goes into the burner unit. To radiate the heat , we place a 55 gallon drum over the propane tank burner unit . To make this unit , we take the drum and place it sides and cut out a portion . A steel plate is placed in the middle . This can act as a cook top . One the other side of the drum ,we make a hole so that it sits in tightly on the propane burner tank. The two upright sides of the barrel is welded with a six inch steel pipe for heat distribution. This pipe acts as suction for the flue pipe . The flue pipe is welded onto this pipe in the middle . So the exhaust gas from the burner comes up and heats the plate over it ,travels up through the barrel into the pipe and moves out through the flue. To control the waste oil coming into the burn chamber of the barrel stove , we use a drip feed system. The oil stored in a bucket is connected to a half inch pipe with a ball valve. The pipe goes into a standard half inch gate valve and further connects to a pipe in pipe system. A half inch inch copper pipe is placed inside a one inch mild steel pipe . The pipe coming from the gate valve is connected to the copper pipe which is inside the mild steel pipe through an elbow. These two pipes goes straight into our burner unit inside the propane tank. The oil gets drip fed into the candy tin of our burner. To get started ,we add some kerosene and light up a fire using the torch. We slowly open the valve to start the oil feed into the burn chamber.
  • DIY Video:How to build a Simple Homemade Pocket Straw Style Water Filter. Small, lightweight and powerful.
    This project goes over the build of an emergency Straw Style Survival Water Filter. This water filter is small, lightweight and ideal for an SHTF scenario or hiking/camping. Very effective for purifying rain or tap water or removing disease causing water contaminants. With regular maintenance the filter should last for years. The materials needed to make this water filter are turkey baster , cotton balls, coffee filters,activated carbon. All these materials can be purchased from your local store or aquarium supply stores. The activated carbon is rated to last for five months if used regularly. Start by taking a cotton ball and push it down the turkey baster. Rinse the activated carbon by running it through tap water before putting them over the cotton balls. Pour the rinsed activated carbon all the way to the top of the pipe and put two more cotton balls at the top . Now take some coffee filter paper and slide it over the top of the cotton balls and tie it down using a twist tie or rubber band so that the whole thing wont slip out when you are using it. If you don't have the cotton balls available, you can always just ball up some pieces of coffee filter paper and put them on either end of the activated carbon in between. An alternative way of using this is to cut the top of the poultry baster and and put it on the top of the straw . Take the dirty water and manually filter it through the straw. Once the material inside the filter gets saturated water moves pretty thoroughly through the straw. The cotton balls in the paper will get dirty pretty quick up here capturing most of the dirt but you can just pull those out periodically and add new ones. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zXJypLXwsiw
  • How to heat your Garage by using an Outdoor Wood Burning Boiler and an old car radiator
    This project goes into the build of an outdoor wood boiler for heating your garage using an old barrel and a car radiator. The first step is to make a wood burning stove out of an old barrel . Here we are converting the barrel into a stove using a vogelzang stove kit. We start by cutting a hole for the door using the the door accessory from the kit as a guide. Place the door on the side of the barrel and mark the four corners. Start cutting the hole using a grinder, reciprocating saw or a plasma torch. Align the door with the hole and drill holes for the screws. The door is now secured in place . Next step is to install the legs that came with the kit. Place the barrel on the the legs and align them so that everything is level. The spots are marked , holes drilled and the legs are bolted in place. To control the air flow and how hot the stove burns, we install the flange and the damper within the chimney area. Center the flange that comes with the kit near the edge and make a circle for cutting the hole. Also mark holes for the bolts using the flange as a guide. The flange along with the damper is then screwed down securely. The next step is to convert this barrel stove into a hot water heater. Begin by drilling two holes across both sides of the barrel and inserting couple of three eighth inch threaded rod across the sides. This creates a base where a 30ft coiled copper tubes are placed to circulate the warm water. A 30ft half inch copper coil with the input and output straight end is placed inside the barrel on top of the two threaded 3/8th rod base which we have installed previously. Two holes are drilled at the back of the barrel so that the input and the output ends of the copper coil can be connected to a pipe or flexible hose. The input end of copper coil coming out at the back of the barrel is further connected to another loop of copper coil outside the barrel . The coil is wound across the barrel so that incoming water is preheated using the outside coil before it goes into the barrel and gets further heated by the coils inside . The ends of the coils are connected to two pipes, the outgoing and the return . These pipes are then insulated using half inch pipe insulation foam to prevent any leak. A small trench is dug and the insulated pipe is extended to the garage. The water circulatory pipes are now connected to an old car radiator inside the garage. The incoming hot water pipe is connected at the top of the radiator and the return is connected at the bottom. To circulate the water ,we use a cheap submersible pump. The pump is submerged in a bucket . The pump will pump cold water out through the heater, the hot water circulates through the radiator , cools down and collected at the bucket and it is again recirculated. Two holes are drilled on the top of the bucket . One for the pipe coming out from the pump and another for the pipe coming back from the radiator. The inch and quarter radiator hose is adjusted to connect to the pex hose piping with the help of a PVC poly tube with a threaded end The other side of the polytube with the threaded end is attached to a PVC adapter and a slip fitting with a bushing. This helps us to connect the pex pipe to the radiator . To prevent the water from boiling , an antifreeze solution is mixed . A window fan is used as a back fan for the radiator. Placed right behind the radiator, this blows the hot air through it and into the garage. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPw9HKAxr8A https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IBMSDp5puEE