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RECENT POSTS YOU MIGHT LIKE
  • DIY Video :How to build a Wood Stove that runs a generator, produces gasoline,runs a fridge and act as a water heater at the same time
    This is a wood powered gasifier stove that produces gasoline runs your generator, runs your propane hot water heater, heats hot water for you all off the grid. A simple design of a mini gasifying woodstove prototype here you've got some open latches, open up the door, the doors got the baton handle so it naturally stops on the downfall Inside the firebox, I've got a gasification style system built in there.One of the key things about a gasifying woodstove is that not only can I run it in a typical gasification wood stove manner, heat my home. But if I reverse that action with a fan and a draw system underneath the stove, with the ability to shut off the flow out the chimney pipe, and then draw down underneath the stove, reverse the action of the system, I can produce syn gas that can go outside and into a generator. This system has little latch up here at the top drops open so you can get in there work the material around.By actually pulling the little latch out and the bottom of the main gasifier inside of there to shut it and rotate it locks into place .It is actually a dump plate on the bottom of the main gasification chamber so that all the ash and all the coal that's not burned can dump out of the system into a tray below. A secondary burn system with two layers of stove pipe, one smaller inner diameter stove pipe and one larger one is made for a better burn to take place with fresh air inlets right there in the chamber. The outer sleeve stops below the bottom allows air to travel up in between rise up to the pipe.There is a set of burner holes that makes sure to mix fresh oxygen that creates a swirl in there and helps burn any leftover syn gas in the production system. So there's no smoke coming out of this in the end. Inside the woodstove is the inner chamber holds all your material, it gets hot and then creates an airdrop between this outer wall and the inner chamber wall that airdrop comes out these holes mixes fresh oxygen into the top of the system with the smoke and burns it. The bottom holes allow air to dry in from the bottom to complete that burn as the material burns down to the bottom. It also works slightly as a venturi system as air is drawn up these walls towards these holes, creates a vacuum down here at the bottom holes and pull some of the smoke out a downward draw into the system and pull some of it into here helping mix some of the smoke With the air and will swirl it so it'll burn cleanly. The single air inlet hole is used to pull the smoke out of the bottom to reverse this process to put syn gas out of this stove outside into a generator. There is inner set of holes in the bottom of the stove pipe.This helps mix air between the walls.The air gets drawn up between the wall since the inner pipe is longer than the outer pipe which mixes fresh air and completes the secondary burn to make sure there's no smoke coming out of this pipe. This is gonna be the bio crude oil production system here which is basically another term for a creosote that you produce from syn gas production, otherwise known as gasification production. It's got just a single pipe rolling out of the backside of it which is connected to a creosote collection container. As this gas starts to cool, it's going to come up to here it's going to work its way up hill, as it does so the hydrogen inside of the gas will be the lightest of all the gas is traveling uphill and definitely make it over the top much of the creosote we built re drip down into the second collection container here. Now the rest of its gonna go up cross through the pipe here and come down to a condenser The reactor shown here is made of two of five gallon steel cans.I cut the top off of one and the bottom off of another and slid them over each other. So they make a really long slide seal over each other one pipe, as you can tell here, welded in. With an elbow, it's a one inch pipe coming out of the back of they're welded in with an elbow. The downward slope of the pipe force the smoke to release as much of this crude as it possibly can. Because it's actually wanting to go uphill, which would be easy to smoke not going to cool real quickly. by forcing it slightly downhill, we're forcing a lot of that heat energy out, making sure it's releasing a lot of that, let's call it creosote or bio crude. It also allows for the creosote to roll down the bottom of the pipe into a container. The gas moves through a reduction point which reduces the pressure.The gas gets refined and reduced slightly in volume through the system. Hydrogen, carbon monoxide and all the rest of the lighter gases are going to easily flow up this pipe through thermodynamic pressure. Now you've cooled a lot of that gas by running it downhill, trying to bring in into this lower container as much the second grade creosote as you can, or biocrude. Now by running it up hill again, you can really force all the heavy hydrocarbons and other elements inside of this to focus out of the hydrogen gas and the carbon monoxide. This is a downhill pipe that's going to go anti the direction of natural thermodynamic processes that'll help condense out or precipitate out some of the oils at a much faster rate than it would be if that pipe was going the natural thermodynamic flow direction.The first catch is going to be the heaviest and thickness of the current Crude oil. It goes down that pipe from a reduction point here into the secondary catch.This comes up the hill here at the lighter gases not yet condensed, rises across loses a lot of energy and now is once again restricted into a quarter inch copper gas pipe into a 5 gallon water tank with a 20 loop condenser coil inside . The pipe out of that tank runs into a one gallon pickle jar. The next pipe comes out of the top of the jar, we're not actually trying to put it down too far because you don't want to bubble and once it starts to fill with crude oil, you just want to grab them the lightest of the gases, the hydrogens and the nitrogen, carbon monoxides and others that are still left within this system you want to grab, grab that right off the top. Now it comes up this pipe here goes through the T and once again we have a secondary condenser that this goes through now it's about four or five loops going through there, comes out through there. And that's where the liquids gonna condense from this condenser that's where it's going to be caught. The liquid will be flowing, dropping the jug and the lighter Smoke will continue on now down the pipe. The result of the bio crude oil project collecting 4 grades of oil.So the next step of this project now is to put this all through the refinery, which will actually be connected inside the woodstove that made all of this. So in the end, what we'll have is all the liquid being produced the crude oil once again, flow back to the woodstove go through the refinery out the refinery tower, and on the other side, we'll have a high grade fuel to use in any engine. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M1imlOX2pGI
  • How to build a Large 2000W Portable Solar Power Generator at Home from scratch.
    The idea of a completely silent power generator that can still run large power loads, and never need gasoline is a really cool concept. This project goes over the build of a large 2000W Portable Solar Generator that can power appliances ranging from a table saw to charging your phone effortlessly. We need a large box to hold our basic components. Here we use a pelican 1620 protector case that is durable, dustproof and waterproof .This is going to be the case that we package everything into. It's got wheels on the bottom so you can roll it around ,also has heavy handles on either sides. The battery is a AGM glass mat ,coil would style, 12V optima deep cycle battery. A deep cycle battery just allows you to get a little bit deeper into the discharge before you are starting to shorten the life of that battery. This battery also has the ability to be mounted in any orientation . So it is safe whether the battery is on its side on its back or even upside down as long as we have it mounted securely so that nothing shorts against our terminals. The next major components for our build is the 2000W inverter from Krieger. This one has some large terminals on the back for our wiring. Also has a active fan here for ventilation. Also comes with a remote control switch. The 100W Solar Panel is from Renogy. It has the bus on the back for connecting in to your solar charger .It also comes with a 30A Solar Charge controller. This can run up to four of the 100 watt panels in a 12 volt system. The back of the solar panel comes pre wired with MC4 connectors, as well as a couple of MC4 pigtails. We use high quality 16 gauge speaker wire to extend the connection. These wires are highly flexible for portable use. To connect it to the MC4 pigtails we need to go ahead and strip the insulation off and use butt splice connectors to crimp them to the MC4 pigtails. In case you cant to charge the system with standard AC power ,we use a 1.5A Battery maintainer / Float or Trickle charger. This will be good for just keeping it topped off when it is in storage. Or if you just want to charge up your batteries and you really don't have a place to be setting the panels out. Next step is mounting components on the outside of the case . Before mounting any component, factor in how the internal components are going to placed inside the case. On one side of the case ,we are going to mount a small LED work lamp with toggle switch, a 12V gauge pod with 5V USB output, digital voltmeter,12V cigarette socket ,an AC input plug for using with the trickle charger, a 6pin solar panel trailer connector. These components are secured in place using a RTV silicone sealant. One the other side of the case , we are going to mount the inverter remote control switch, 350A high current plug which is used for jumper cables or to add high current loads, a GFCI AC outlet with a weatherproof cover. The GFCI outlet is connected to the inverter inside the case. We want to put the battery as close to the wheels as possible, because that will help keep the heaviest part down low when moving the case around either on the wheels or by carrying it. We place it snug into a corner of the case using battery mount and couple of pieces of 2X4. The inverter is placed inside the case in such a way that there is enough space for air ventilation and for tucking some of the wires underneath. The inverters are secured in place using mounting tabs and 10x24 machine screws. The PWM solar charge controller is also mounted in the same way near the solar panel connector input. The trickle charger / battery maintainer is placed as low into the back of the case .This is not something that will get very warm so we don't need to worry about heat dissipation or anything like that . We plug the power cord from the trickle charger into the AC input cord. Next step is the wiring. We start by connecting the power cables from the inverter to the battery. The positive and negative from the inverter is connected to the positive and negative of the battery respectively. To distribute power in our generator ,we use a six circuit fuse panel for the positives and a busbar for the grounds. We use two inexpensive battery cables to run the power to our distribution blocks as well as running the power to our high current quick connector. The positive red connection from the quick connector goes to the fuse panel and the black negative connector to the ground busbar. Both connections are further extended to connect to the positives and negatives of the battery respectively. The LED lights are connected to the 3 way connector switches. The switches are further connected to the power distribution fuse block. Similarly a single switch is connected to the USB outlet, voltmeter and the cigarette lighter ports in parallel. The positive from the switch is connected through a daisy chain mechanism to the three positives of the ports ,the negatives are similarly connected to our distribution block. At this point, we now have a power wire and a ground wire for every single one of our accessories connections . We bundle these wires and keep it neat and tidy using zip ties. Separate the positive wires from the negative wires, we are going to be rounding the negative wires to our ground busbar. After we have all of the ground wires connected, we can move on to the power wires on our distribution block. Each one of the blade connectors represents one fuse circuit. We connect the positive red wires from charge controller, battery trickle charger, usb ports,voltmeter,12V outlet to the fuse circuit. We are using a 30A fuse for the charge controller,12V socket, 20A for the LED work lights, 5A for the trickle charger. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLIorqrLdxMKZV464fFUflegLuuvLEyMrU
  • Cool DIY Video : How to build an Underground Survival Shelter from an Old Shipping Container -Step by step Video Instructions
    This 3 part video series shows you how to safely build an Underground Survival Shelter from a 20ft shipping container.This is a great step-by-step example of how a 20 foot container can be buried, reinforced, and have utilities added to make a shelter that has everything you’d need in an emergency, and double as a cellar for food storage.Whether you’d like a cellar, prepper space, a ‘man cave’ or just an addition onto your home, shipping containers are quite a good start for above or below the ground shelters or rooms.

    Watch the DIY Underground Shipping Container Survival Bunker build Videos