DIY Video: How to build a Homemade Gravity fed ,Drip Waste Oil Heater for your Garage .Clean and Efficient

    This project goes over the build of a simple gravity drip fed waste oil burner that can be used to heat your shop/garage efficiently.It heats up the garage to about 30 to 40 degrees. Hot air from the center pipe reaches up to 500 degree celsius. Once dialed in, the smoke clears and the burner is stable at 400’C.

    The materials needed for this project are grinder,MiG welder,plasma cutter, scrap propane tank,hammer,enclosed brake disc, steel cooking pan, 4 inch 10ft pipe, bolts and iron rod and temperature sensor to keep track of the heat.

    The footing and the chimney pipe is welded onto the propane tank.Add a pipe right through the middle and weld the retainers for the pan and the legs around the vessel.

    To improve the airflow , we cut bunch of holes around the legs. Also added some more spaces on the legs to keep the temperature away from the concrete floor. We also make a venting hole on both sides at the middle of the propane tank .

    To adjust the temperature, we add 2 7/16 primary holes right at the base above the heating pan. You control the burner by adjusting the input airflow into the burning chamber.

    Don’t make the air holes for the draft on the burner too big but have plenty of holes so that with the increase the temperature and the increase in airspeed, the draft the fresh air can actually get to the burner, and you will get cleaner burn. These secondary holes allow for more oil splatter to leave the burner if any water content is present.

    The drip system is kept open which helps you to check how much oil flow is there and also as a safety precaution. If there is any kind of flashback, it will pop out of here and not go all the way through the the pipe back into the reservoir.

    This whole system is completely serviceable, completely mobile,not bolted down.You can unhook the chimney, the exhaust pipe, remove the drip system pipe and the rest.

    The drip system is made of heavy pipe and a small ball valve that is welded in place at the distance and at a specific height so as to dissipate the heat coming from the burner. Also you dont want the oil to reverse its direction and go back into the pipe.

    With the help of a fans, we increase the heat dispersion. With two fans,one blows hot air away from the wall and the other allows extra air for the burn.It pulls cold air from the floor and allows fresh air intake. Effective heating and keep the heat away from the wall.

    To start the system, we pour the waste oil onto the steel pan and place it under the burner. Make sure you dont have any trace of water in the pan or oil. The oil will splatter out of the secondary holes if there is water.The more you can bring in to the burning chamber,the more it will burn and more it will smoke.



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