How to build a Homemade Archimedes Screw Turbine using PVC parts to generate Off the grid Power from a flowing river or stream/creek

    This project goes over the build of an Archimedes Turbine that can generate off the grid power from a flowing river or creek. This is basically a screw that turns when water passes through the pipe.

    You need a 5 foot farming auger to build this. The farming auger is put inside of a 6 inch pipe and placed in the creek at a certain angle, water would pour into the auger and that water would weigh down that auger and turn it. And so as it turned, it would turn a shaft that is attached to the end of the pipe and run a pulley system with a motor to generate electricity.

    We take an old belt sander and shave some of the edges to make it smooth and rotate without any friction inside the pipe.

    We use an angle grinder to split the pipe down the middle and use the separator nuts to kind of give more space in the pipe. Make sure you don’t split the pipe into two.

    Open up enough space on the top by heating the PVC and clamp 2 spacer boards on either side and stretch the opening by using a C clamp.

    2 three quarter inch boards are bolted using carriage bolts on either side of the pipe which gives us enough room here to get the auger installed.

    Allthreads of size eight and quarter inches are put through the boards and secured in place with the help of some washers and non locking nuts.



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