DIY Video:How to build a Simple Homemade Pocket Straw Style Water Filter. Small, lightweight and powerful.

    This project goes over the build of an emergency Straw Style Survival Water Filter. This water filter is small, lightweight and ideal for an SHTF scenario or hiking/camping. Very effective for purifying rain or tap water or removing disease causing water contaminants. With regular maintenance the filter should last for years.

    The materials needed to make this water filter are turkey baster , cotton balls, coffee filters,activated carbon. All these materials can be purchased from your local store or aquarium supply stores. The activated carbon is rated to last for five months if used regularly.

    Start by taking a cotton ball and push it down the turkey baster.

    Rinse the activated carbon by running it through tap water before putting them over the cotton balls.

    Pour the rinsed activated carbon all the way to the top of the pipe and put two more cotton balls at the top .

    Now take some coffee filter paper and slide it over the top of the cotton balls and tie it down using a twist tie or rubber band so that the whole thing wont slip out when you are using it. If you don’t have the cotton balls available, you can always just ball up some pieces of coffee filter paper and put them on either end of the activated carbon in between.

    An alternative way of using this is to cut the top of the poultry baster and and put it on the top of the straw . Take the dirty water and manually filter it through the straw.

    Once the material inside the filter gets saturated water moves pretty thoroughly through the straw. The cotton balls in the paper will get dirty pretty quick up here capturing most of the dirt but you can just pull those out periodically and add new ones.



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