How to build a Homemade DIY Geothermal Heat Exchanger to Cool Your Garage

    This project goes over the build of a Geothermal heat pump that takes the hot air in your garage and cool it down by transferring that heat into water .The cold water is pulled out of the ground through a shallow hand dug well and send to a heat exchanger inside the garage . A fan attached to the heat exchanger blows out the cold air into the garage . The heat exchanger absorbs the existing heat inside the garage . The warmed up water is then removed through an exhaust pipe.

    Just a few feet down the earth is a consistent 55 degrees, summer or winter. Water at that depth is about the same temperature. To harness the cold water down below, we dig a shallow well. To do this we use a post auger and a 3 foot long well point that is attached to a 10 foot three quarter inch pipe using a drive coupling. We start by digging a hole using the post auger till the water table is reached and then start driving using the well point for additional two to three feet until it is submerged under the water table.

    A two to three foot trench is dug from where the well is installed to the garage . A One inch poly pipe is connected to the well pipe using a barbed coupling and is buried inside the two foot trench all the way to a well jet pump .The trench is dug down at least two feet until you hit some hard pan clay that is about where the temperatures begins being more constant. This keeps the pipe cool under the earth.

    The other end of the poly pipe coming out from the trench is connected a 1/2 HP Flotec Shallow well jet pump . The pump can be powered by a solar panel. The pump is kept outside the garage as it generates a lot of heat. If it is kept inside the garage, cooling effect from the water will be undone by the heat generated by the pump.

    The output of the pump is connected to a three quarter inch copper pipe inside the garage. It is then further connected to a water pressure tank with the help of a brass tee and a union. A relief valve is also attached to the tee to empty the water tank if the pressure gets too high. A water pressure tank is used prevent the pump from failure .It also acts as a buffer storage.

    The other end of the brass tee is connected to two pipes. One pipe goes outside the garage to a faucet and the other pipe is connected to a radiator that acts as a finned tube heat exchanger.

    The heat exchanger captures the hot air surrounding the garage and stores the heat into the finned coils within the radiator .The heat is transferred to the water flowing through them . An exhaust line from the radiator carries this hot water to outside the garage.

    Two flexible hose pipes connects the input of the heat exchanger to the water tank and output to an exhaust pipe. A box fan is placed in the front of the radiator to blow the cool air . The fan can be powered by Solar panels. Once the water starts running through the radiator , we start the fan



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