DIY Video : How to turn Dirty-water/Salt-water to a clean fresh drinking water by building a simple Water distillation system


    This Video shows the build of a simple distillation unit from a water bottle that can be used to make fresh water from ocean water. Any steel container could work for this project. I almost used a small stainless steel food container, but decided a water bottle was a more practical object to carry.Knowing how to make distilled water is not just useful in a survival situation. It can also be an invaluable skill if your home’s tap water contains certain chemicals or impurities that you’d rather not drink.

    Watch the DIY Simple Salt Water Distiller Build



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