DIY Video: How to build a really efficient Portable Ammo Box Wood Stove


    This video shows the build of a really efficient Portable Ammo Box Wood Stove .Great for outdoorsmen, adventurers, preppers, survivalist and anyone looking for a small, portable stove for both heating and cooking. Plus, it’s a fun project and makes a great gift for the outdoor enthusiast or hobbyist. The materials needed for this project are 50 Cal Ammo Box,Stove Rope Kit,Propane cylinder,Fiberglass Cloth,Mica Sheet,12″ Steel Tent Stakes, 4mm thick steel plate,22 gauge steel sheet,16 gauge, Steel rivets ,BBQ skewer,4 copper pennies,2 small compression springs,3 ½” hose clamp.

     

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