DIY Video : How to build a Simple Homemade PVC Wind Turbine Generator with Swivel Top .Produces electricity to run lights, charge batteries

    This video series shows the build of a Mini Wind Turbine with Swivel Top.This produces electricity to run lights, charge batteries etc .The build made of PVC’s can withstands high winds.This can “direct wire” it to a light bulb (shown in video) or charge batteries to store power for later use. (for AC power use an AC inverter with battery).A Wind test is also shown (to over 100 mph).The series also shows how to make the propeller/turbine blade shown in the video.

    Watch the DIY Mini Wind Turbine Generator using PVC’s build Videos



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