How to turn Dirty-water/Salt-water to a clean fresh drinking water by building a simple Water distillation system

    This project goes into the build a simple Survival water purifier that can turn salt water /sea water into fresh drinkable water .This purifier is portable, easy to make and is very inexpensive. It works by the principle of desalination .When sea water/ salt water is heated to its boiling point, the water turns into steam which leaves the salt behind. Condensing the steam back into water ,it is purified.

    The materials you need to build this desalination unit are a simple non insulated stainless steel bottle with a steel lid , copper tubing , stove or heating source, bottle for collecting the condensed water, soldering unit, right angle compression fiting. The condenser of this desalination unit is made from one quarter inch copper tubing.

    Remove the lid and the gasket from the bottle . A hole is drilled using a drill press at the top of the lid to accommodate the quarter inch copper tubing . Before soldering the copper tubing , clean the surface of both copper and the stainless steel lid with the help of a sandpaper. The copper tubing is pushed through the hole just enough to stick half an inch from both side. It is then soldered securely in place. Once this is completed , the silicon gasket is then re-installed in the lid and lid is screwed back on to the bottle.

    A right angle compression fitting is pressed into the lid at the copper tubing opening . The extension tube at the other end of the compression fitting is removed and replaced with a rubber gasket for better seal for the lock nut.

    The copper coil for the re-condensing the steam when the water is boiling is made by wrapping the copper tube up tightly against the stainless bottle . Eight or nine turns of the tubing is ideal. The ends of the coil are bend outwards so that when one end is pressed into the fitting on the bottle, the other side will be sticking straight out.

    The salt or sea water is added to the bottle and reattached to the lid which is hanging over a heat source such as a wood stove or camp fire. The other end of the coil is placed near a collection container to collect the distilled water.

    To produce more condensed water out of the copper tubing ,we need to cool it down. Otherwise the production of steam will outweigh the production of the condensed water. To cool the copper tubing , wet put a wet piece of cloth soaked in cold water and wrap it around the coil or dip the whole bottom half of the copper coil into a vessel filled with cold water.



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